Why this?

We want to support a strong Europe united in diversity - and use the history and experience of the national minorities as case.

In June, 13 young students from minorities in all of Europe attended the Minority Lab in Târgu Mureș, Romania

In June, 13 young students from minorities in all of Europe attended the Minority Lab in Târgu Mureș, Romania

Photo: Bereczky Zsolt

Europe has a brutal history. For centuries, Europeans have fought over a mix of culture, language, ethniticity, and territory. In fact, the past 70 years is the longest period in European history without wars between two nation states - and still, we have seen regional conflicts as those in the Balkans and in Ukraine.

Modern Europeans, both people and governments, fortunately share the ideology of “unity in diversity” - let us respect that we have different backgrounds and recognize our common goal of living good, prosperous lives in peace.

But this shared ideology does not stay shared by itself. We need to keep reminding each other of cultural understanding and mutual respect. Too often, we see people, politicians, and even leaders forget the history and treat other nationalities and ethnicities with contempt.

Together, we want to ask the question: How can the idea of minorities help shape a Europe that embodies “unity in diversity”? How can the many different national minorities promote a united Europe - and not work against it?

We want to educate and create generations of young Europeans - from minorities as well as majorities - who see themselves as belonging to both their regional culture, to their nation, and to Europe. And who helps other Europeans see things the same way.

Change starts with knowledge and friendship. That is what we are building.